Watch: We Ran Out Of Water

When we were kids we would sing “rain, rain, go away, come back another day”… but today – especially if you live in Cape Town or on a farm in the Northern Cape – our hearts leap excitedly at the sight of drizzle and we pray for it to stay, longing for it to rain more heavily and nurture our land and fill our dams.

In October 2016 this photo went viral – showing a young farmer’s son in the Free State, South Africa, thanking “sweet Jesus” for the rain.

This morning well known Facebook user Nas Daily, who posts a one-minute video each day, realised this change in our perception… and posted a video in which Cape Town is mentioned, along with the Middle East and California, where severe droughts are also being experienced. Watch below.

He said: “I woke up today almost sad at a rainy day… Then I saw my father and he was as happy as it gets.

“So instead of struggling to hide the fact that it was “terrible weather” today, I made a video explaining why my dad was happy to see rain (as I’m sure many others were too).”


 

Watch Nas Daily on the Rain:

WE RAN OUT OF WATER!

I woke up today almost sad at a rainy day…Then I saw my father and he was as happy as it gets.So instead of struggling to hide the fact that it was "terrible weather" today, I made a video explaining why my dad was happy to see rain (as I'm sure many others were too)LIKE Nas Daily on Facebook and Instagram!Music: Piano Storytelling by Immersive Music

Posted by Nas Daily on Monday, January 1, 2018

Nas was recently in South Africa and experienced the effects of the drought first-hand in Cape Town, where visitors have been invited – and taught – how to save water during their vacation. (Watch Nik Rabinowitz’s funny water saving video for Cape Town tourists.)

Latest Update on Cape Town’s Drought and Water Situation

Yesterday Cape Town entered Level 6 restrictions as the Mother City experiences its worst drought in decades and Day Zero looms ever closer (when taps will be turned off and residents will have to queue for water).

Level 6 restrictions include a 60% reduction in water usage by agricultural users, 45% reduction by commercial properties, and no use of drinking water for washing cars or filling pools. Using borehole water is also being discouraged – in an effort to preserve groundwater resources.

A controversial drought levy, based on property value, is also on the cards.

Residents in drought-stricken areas are realising that without the rain, there’s no rainbow…